64-bit vs 32-bit Test

Jeff L's Avatar

Jeff L

13 Jun, 2012 05:37 PM

Can you help me understand the 64-bit vs 32-bit test? So I have a 64-bit operating system installed on my work laptop, so I wanted to check out the GeekBench score randomly. However, try-out mode only supports 32-bit tests so I ran that and got 9317.

How should I interpret this? If I'm running an application that's built to support 32-bits, the computer will perform at a 9317 level. If I'm running a 64-bit application, would the computer perform at a 18,634 level?

  1. Support Staff 1 Posted by John on 13 Jun, 2012 06:38 PM

    John's Avatar

    Hi Jeff,

    Thanks for your message. You can find out how to interpret Geekbench scores at the following page:

    http://support.primatelabs.ca/kb/geekbench/interpreting-geekbench-s...

    In order to find out how your system will perform with 64-bit applications you must run the 64-bit benchmarks (it's not as simple as doubling the 32-bit score).

    Let me know if you have any other questions and I'd be happy to help out.

    Best,
    John

  2. 2 Posted by Dylan on 17 Dec, 2015 12:43 PM

    Dylan's Avatar

    Is there any way to tell if the 32 bit test would yield higher or lower results? My dual core 2.8ghz AMD processor got a 2420 on the multi core scrore.

  3. 3 Posted by billtech66 on 28 Jun, 2017 03:51 PM

    billtech66's Avatar

    I also would like to know the answer to this.
    To decide if I want to buy the upgrade.

    so, the terrible answer from John, does not help me or Jeff one bit.

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